WRITING

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Carolyn began her writing career in fourth grade for The Asbury Park Press, a state-wide paper in New Jersey, as a child movie reviewer writing for other kids. Since then, Carolyn has written a variety of different performance pieces ranging from sketch shows to theater for young audience pieces. 

 

She has had plays produced with Island Theater Company, Ghostlight Ensemble, Knife & Fork Theatre, and SoloCrowd Chicago. Upon arriving in Chicago, Carolyn studied at iO Chicago, Second City, and The Annoyance to develop her improv and comedy skills leading to writing sketches and stand-up performed in Chicago. From there she moved into devising with the ensemble, Knife & Fork. This lead to her developing several pieces performed in short play festivals, such as AbbieFest and Brecht 3High. In the last year Carolyn has been developing  solo performance pieces with SoloCrowd Chicago. Currently she is focusing on blending long-form storytelling with text messaging through an app.

Excerpt from Expiration Date, a short film

INT. 

Restaurant, at the server station of the bar. 2 employees are standing there. Niko, bartender, 30, handsome but not the brightest, standing at the entryway. Carol, 40, short, feisty, playing with the ticket stabber.

 

Niko:

Oh God, she’s late and looks like shit.

 

Carol:

Dude, she passed out in my lobby last night. I bet she says it’s food poisoning.

 

(Sarah, 25, disheveled, walks up to them in a flustered hurry to clock in.)

 

Sarah:

Ommigod, did he say anything yet?

 

Carol:

No, but being late to a six o’clock dinner shift is really impressive.

 

Sarah:

I think I have food poisoning.

 

Niko:

Does Tito’s count as food poisoning?

 

Sarah:

Carol, you told him already?

 

Carol:

I didn’t think it was a secret. 

 

Niko:

I mean, it’s not usually a secret when we get sloppy.

 

Sarah:

Ugh, cmon. Haven’t you guys messed up before?

 

Niko & Carol:

Yeah.

 

Niko:

Oh shit, Carol. There’s that guy from last week.

 

Carol:

Calm down, I didn’t fuck him. I didn’t. Please, I have a list of everyone I fucked in my phone, why would I

lie about this one particular guy?

 

Niko:

Cuz he’s a Republican.

 

Carol:

I cannot believe I went on a date with him. 

Sarah:

What’s the big deal? My Dad’s a Republican?

 

Carol:

Gross.

 

Sarah:

That’s mean.

 

Carol:

No, keeping kids in cages is mean. 

 

Niko:

Kids in cages?

 

Carol:

Geeeezus. Maybe 4chan isn’t the best source for your news. Ugh, lemme go greet that fucking MBA student. Barf.

 

An Excerpt from New Jersey Rocks!, a solo performance piece

I’m a present from Point Pleasant... NJ, like I came home from the hospital in a onesie that has that printed on it.

 

My dad’s family’s italian and my mom’s family’s Irish and we are loud and big and full of fight and fun. I know people named Rosanne Baranco and Jessica Poulous and Lorie Jaworski and Adam Lustig. We eat veal Marsala and eggplant parmigiana and latkes and sauerkraut. . 

 

My parents saw Bruce Springsteen perform at the store pony in the 70s and said they were not the best band. 

 

We would go crabbing in the barnegat bay and drive to my grammy’s house for family birthday parties and had a jacuzzi in our basement and a four foot deep above ground pool in the back yard. 

 

It was January of 1990 and my life was FINALLY taking off. I had my first job writing movie reviews for The Asbury Park Press. “Ya need Babar by Tuesday, I’ll get it to you right after I do my fractions chief!”I got AMAZING perks: two tickets for the movie I was reviewing (it was fourth and fifth grade - the second ticket was for a parent), 18 dollars at the concession stand (which in 88-89 standards was a shit ton of junior mints and popcorn) and 20 dollars for each review. That new found financial independence bought my already curly hair a spiral perm and my bedroom a Bradford exchange plate like rich Mrs. Hammill’s house. 

 

I knew how babies were made, but had managed to glean this highly coveted info from friends with older siblings, deftly dodging the awkward conversation with my SUPER CATHOLIC PARENTS. 

Scaredy Friends

a short play for young audiences

by Carolyn Minor

 

Cast:

 

Both actors should be strong movement based/physical performers with the ability to be believable as children. Devising/choreographing the pauses and chase scene will be created during the rehearsal process with the director. 

 

Jacky: 9 year old female identifying human (any race)

 

Monster: 9 year old female identifying monster (any race)

 

The playwright would like all screams to be represented by puppeteers moving the words/sounds between the two characters, like gymnastics ribbons on sticks.


 

We open on Jacky, a 9 year old girl, asleep in her bed. She is softly breathing. A closet door creeks open slowly from upstage right, and a small fluffy monster comes out (roughly the size and shape of a 9 year old). Jacky begins to stir and notices the monster.

 

Jacky:

(fearfully)

EEEEEEEEEEEEHHHHHHHHHHH

 

Monster:

(gasps in horror moving toward Jacky and gobbles up her scream)

 

The two stare at each other silently, both trying to figure the other out.

 

Jacky:

(fearfully)

EEEEEEEEEEEEHHHHHHHHHHH

 

Monster:

(Again moves toward Jacky and gobbles up her scream)

 

The two stare at each other and then Jacky takes off running and monster follows her, around the room in a circle, up onto the bed back off the bed to downstage around and around until they both fall down panting. 

 

Jacky:

(softly crying)

Mommmyyyy. I want my mommy me. 

(This dialogue the words move with the sticks to the other actor more slowly and gently)

 

Monster:

(Again comes forward in a panic and gobbles the words as monster is also softly crying.

They stare at each other again. Monster holds their finger up to their mouth.)

Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!

 

Jacky:

(Wipes her tears away, whispering, this dialogue the words move to the other actor and the actor wraps them around themselves like a blanket or scarf)

Are you crying?

 

Monster:

(Shakes head yes, and wipes tears away)

I’m scared. 

 

Jacky:

(Whispering)

Me too. You ate my words!

 

Monster:

(Whispering)

I did! I thought you’re mom and dad would come and take me away. 

 

Jacky:

(Whispering)

I thought you came to take me away!

 

(The two move closer together, with each line bringing greater emotional connection.)

 

Monster:

I came to find a friend. All my friends are gone from the closet. They got taken by the moms and dads. 

 

Jacky:

I didn’t know they wanted friends. I thought they wanted to take me away. 

 

Monster:

Did you ever ask?

 

Jacky: 

No. But you didn’t ever say. 

 

Monster: 

I know, but you didn’t ever ask.

 

(They are now sitting next to each other)

 

Monster:

I’m really sorry I took your words away. 

 

Jacky:

I’m really sorry I didn’t talk to you first. 

 

Monster:

Can we...can we be friends? It’s lonely and scary in the closet?

 

Jacky:

Of course, if thats ok with you. It’s lonely and scary out here by yourself too. 

Monster:

Pinky swear, no more yelling?

 

Jacky:

Pinky swear, no more secrets?

 

(They pinky swear and climb into bed with two dolls.  Mom comes in from the hallway to peak and does a double take, Monster sneaks under the bed before she turns around again. Mom rubs her eyes and stares, shrugs, and leaves closing the door)

 

Monster & Jacky:

(giggling)

Phew!

 

Fade to black.